Jenna Bradwell

Medical bionics forges new links with China

Establishing international collaborations in medical bionics has been the focus for University of Wollongong academics who headed to Beijing to meet with Chinese colleagues this month (Saturday 8 December).

Delivering a series of presentations about the field of Nanobionics, ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) researchers from the University of Wollongong, Victoria’s St Vincent’s Hospital and the Academy of Science explored the potential for future Chinese partnership.

ACES Director Professor Gordon Wallace led the research sabbatical to address the group on the emerging area of medical technology.

“The conference explored ways that researchers in Australia and China might collaborate in an emerging field of research where nanotechnology is being applied to improve and invent new medical bionic devices,” Professor Wallace said.

“We are really looking forward to commencing specific programs with our Chinese colleagues as we embark on the Memorandum of Understanding in 2013,” he said.

According to Professor Wallace, international collaboration is an essential feature for multidisciplinary areas of research such as Nanobioncs.

“Global challenges in the area of medical bionics require global solutions,” Professor Wallace said.

“Events like this are critical to bringing together skills across the fundamentals of molecular design, to materials synthesising and processing, device fabrication and clinical testing so that effective advances are realised in the shortest time frame possible,” he said.

The ‘Collaborations in Medical Bionics’ conference also included talks from ACES Chief Investigator Professor Mark Cook, UOW Professor Xu-Feng Huang and UOW Pro Vice-Chancellor (Health) Professor Don Iverson.

Chinese attendees at the event represented the following organisations:

Institute of Chemistry and Institute of Zoology, Academy of Science, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Soochow University, Guangzhou Medical University, Wenzhou Medical College, Tsinghua University and Nankai University.

By Melissa Coade


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  • Professor Mark Cook from St Vincent’s Hospital discussed epilepsy detection and control at the Beijing conference.

  • Second row: (from left) Professor Young Liy, Professor Yijing Wang, Dr Caiyun Wang, Dr Wei Xu, Professor Shu Wang, Professor Gaoquan Shi, Professor Zhiyuan Zhong and Professor Baohang Han. First row: (from left) Professor Don Iverson, Professor Mark Cook, Professor Gordon Wallace, Professor Dequing Zhang, Professor Lei Jiang and Professor Xufeng Huang.

  • UOW’s Pro-Vice Chancellor (Health) Professor Don Iverson highlighted UOW’s vision for future research in medical bionics.